21st Century Literature’s Staying Power

21st Century Literature’s Staying Power
Fostering a love of reading is at the core of the Seven Arrows curriculum. From kindergarten on, all students read or partake in guided reading for at least 20 minutes every night. Reading is a gateway to learning, reinforcing lessons or opening doors to the unknown. For lovers of fiction, reading is a way to explore the boundaries of creativity and testing their imagination. For young readers, it’s a way to independently explore while broadening vocabulary and learning reading comprehension techniques.

We do our best to present and implement a balanced curriculum that includes language arts, Global Cultural History (GCH), math, and STEAM alongside the arts and PE classes. However, for much of our nation, a devotion to language arts is being overshadowed by the need for scientists, engineers, and computational thinkers. English and literature departments on the university level are losing funding and sometimes shutting down altogether in favor of the newer technology and science-driven fields dominating the early 21st century. Being an English or humanities major is often met with the response of “and what will you do with that degree” or “that’s a great way to make minimum wage once you enter the workforce.” Published in 2016, the article “What Can I Do with an English Major?” states “there is much more similarity in the occupational futures of BA holders than there are differences. Students should study what they love, work hard, learn a lot, and they will find employment success.” The era of a BA defining your career has been replaced by a need for postgraduate studies and multiple career shifts in a lifetime. In the end, every parent wants their child to be happy and successful, and it appears that they will be happy whether they drown themselves in scientific formulas or Ayn Rand analysis.

All of this is to say that a love and appreciation for literature is still important and not outdated by the latest and greatest gadgets. A love of reading does not necessarily mean that your child is destined to be an English major, but if they do come home from their first year of college, many years from now, perhaps be happy that they have found a passion. You can respond with, “what is the latest thing you’ve read and learned?”

Read “Literature in the Age of Google” here>